Aki Solomos

Traveler, writer, reviewer, all-round observer. I like anything cool & fast, but occasionally sit at a cafe watching the world go by.

NEWS FLASH – May 1, 1940 – The Roving Reporter, Aki Solomos, Covering The News 75 Years Ago Today

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May 1, 1940
As trouble continues on land and sea throughout the world, your Roving Reporter brings you the news as it happens to give you folks at home the stories of the day…

King Haakon and Crown Prince Olav with General Otto Ruge, Commander-in-chief of the Norwegian Army -Photo: Scanpix courtesy of The Royal House of Norway

King Haakon and Crown Prince Olav with General Otto Ruge.
-Photo: Scanpix courtesy of The Royal House of Norway

‘Battle of Norway Rages On’
After the surprise German takeover of Denmark on April 9th, and simultaneous attacks on Norway in their attempt to occupy it, King Haakon VII of Norway and the remaining government established a provisional government in the northern Norwegian city of Tromso today.

German reinforcements brought in by warship march out from Oslo harbour, April 1940 -Imperial War Museums

German reinforcements brought in by warship march out from Oslo harbour, April 1940 -Imperial War Museums

And although things look grim for Norway as 4,000 Norwegian troops trapped in Lillehammer surrendered to the German onslaught, a German counter-attack was fought off by a strong Norwegian resistance near Narvik.

The Evacuation from Namsos May 1940, The French troopship EL DJEZAIR setting sail to Scapa Flow. Courtesy of The Imperial War Museums

The Evacuation from Namsos May 1940, The French troopship EL DJEZAIR setting sail to Scapa Flow.
Courtesy of The Imperial War Museums

Meanwhile a train carrying the British 15th Brigade en route to Andalsnes, crashed into a bomb crater killing 8 and injuring 30. Marching the remaining 17 miles through deep snow, the surviving troops arrived at the port at 9am earlier this morning to partake in the evacuation. In all, over 5000 soldiers are to be evacuated from Norway by sea.

And out at sea, in their valiant effort to keep the Germans at bay, British submarine HMS Narwhal fired several torpedoes at a convoy that was headed to re-supply the German forces in Norway, sinking the German steamer Buenos Aeres and damaging the German transport Bahia Castillo.

‘First War-Caused Civilian Death In England’
The first civilian death in England caused by the war occurred when a German Heinkel bomber crashed in Essex today. The bomber was carrying sea-mines intended for the shipping lanes, but became lost in the fog and was fired upon by antiaircraft guns near Harwich. After being damaged, it circled over Clacton-on-Sea for half an hour while looking for a place to land.
Upon crash landing into a home, one of the mines exploded killing its occupants Frederick Gill and his wife Dorothy along with the bomber crew, and injuring over 160 other civilians in the neighborhood.

‘Politics As Usual’
As part of the war effort, the British government passed a trade agreement today allowing women to work in munitions factories.
Meanwhile, President Roosevelt insisted upon Italy to stay out of the war in Europe. Their response came with Mussolini stating that Germany could not be defeated. This could be the tale-tale sign of the fascist government’s plans to join the Nazis furthering their occupational rule.

Benito-Mussolini 1940

Benito Mussolini -1940

That’s all for now. Your Roving Reporter, Aki Solomos, signing off.

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