Aki Solomos

Traveler, writer, reviewer, all-round observer. I like anything cool & fast, but occasionally sit at a cafe watching the world go by.

NEWS FLASH – March 24-25, 1940 – The Roving Reporter, Aki Solomos, Covering The News 75 Years Ago Today

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In honor of WWII and the courageous vets of the time, this is my reporting and take of the news, 75 years ago today

March 25, 1940
As trouble continues on land and sea throughout the world, your Roving Reporter brings you the news as it happens to give you folks at home the stories of the day…

‘Magnetic Storm Wrecks Havoc’
The United States was attacked yesterday not by any known enemy, but by a magnetic storm which swept through the west coast. All radio signals, television broadcasts, and any form of communications turned into nothing more than garble and static. Locals are all glad this happened on a Sunday otherwise things may have been worse. Meanwhile in Washington today, the government gave the US Army Corps the authorization to sell their most advanced aircraft to any country opposing the Axis.

‘More Merchant Ships Fall Victim’

German submarines U-52, 57, and 56  docked side-by-side

German submarines U-52, 57, and 56 docked side-by-side

In Casablanca, Morocco, 28 sailors were killed and 24 injured yesterday when a torpedo accidentally detonated in the French destroyer La Railleuse as it was departing from the port. And more unarmed ships were attacked off the coast of Scotland by German submarines today. Germany’s U-57 torpedoed the British tanker Daghestan, killing 3 of the 32 sailors, and U-47 sinks the Danish steamer Britta, killing 13 of the 18 crewmen.

Danish steamer Britta. Image from www.uboat.net

Danish steamer Britta.
Image from http://www.uboat.net

‘Tensions Mount In Europe”
All across the French and German borders, tensions begin to grow as patrols and activities increase on both sides yesterday. Meanwhile in England, the British government forbade any British prisoner of war to broadcast any radio messages for the enemy, proclaiming it as against prisoner-conduct rules according to the Geneva Convention.

‘England Adds Lights To Their Coast’
On the lighter side, the British government began placing automatic light-floats along the treacherous shipping routes off the British coast, to replace the ones lost or damaged by German bombing which were manned 24 hours a day. These light-floats act as floating light-houses, warning any approaching vessel of rocks and other hazards.

One of several British light-ships off the coast of England. Image from http://ww2news.com

One of several British light-ships off the coast of England.
Image from http://ww2news.com

That’s it for now. Your Roving Reporter, Aki Solomos, signing off.

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This entry was posted on March 25, 2015 by in 1940 WWII History and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , .
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